Which of the six Prism.K12 strategies would you use to design a lesson around this content?

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lhoffman
Which of the six Prism.K12 strategies would you use to design a lesson around this content?

Explore one section within the “Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series” section on the website—Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000), Migration and Community, Segregation and Discrimination, or Lawrence’s Artistic Process. Which of the six Prism.K12 strategies (Identify, Connect, Compare, Express, Empathize, Synthesize) would you use to design a lesson around this content covered in the section? Describe how and why you would employ this strategy or strategies in your teaching. Please respond in this forum by logging in and writing your thoughts in the comment section below.

lgracec_1348
Migration and Community + Connect

Many of my adult immigrant students do not have knowledge of the Great Migration. There are so many parallels between this movement and their own immigration story! To contextualize the Migration Series for them and to contextualize the story, I would draw on the wealth of experience that they bring to the discussion.  We could, in our limited English (with translation and scaffolding) compare and contrast using a Venn diagram the migration experience dipicted in the Migration Series and their story. 

 

1. Look at Lawrence's Migration Series and primary sources (such as photos from the time) and describe their life in the South, their journey, and the life in the North.

2. Draw pictures from students' own life in their country, their journey, and their new life in DC.

3. Write words that describe their drawings.

4. Start the Venn diagram project in small groups using the simple words from the drawings.

5. One person can present each part of the diagram in the group. This part of the process would involve practicing speaking for a day or 2. Ss could also record a video of themselves speaking the differences and similarities. The rest of the class can rate the clarity of their speaking using a rubric.

je.berg
Related PrismK12 Strategies

I think using Venn diagrams is a great way to help students, of any age, better understand the similarities and differences between their own migration story and the story told by Jacob Lawrence. As you already noted, the Prism K12 Connect strategy helps provide a shared context for students, but this lesson also challenges students to IDENTIFY similarities and differences and COMPARE both experiences. Prism K12 strategies often overlap and can be used to build on one another - feel free to use multiple strategies when planning lessons!

 

Cheers, Jon

bcccah_1347
My upcoming class consists of

My upcoming class consists of adult second language learners from all over the world. The topics discussed in the migration series will definitely hit home with many of them.  I would consider constructing a lesson using the Prism K12 strategy of connecting.  This strategy would make the most sense for my learners to truly interact with the artwork and the themes behind the Migration and Community section.

The class would start with a gallery walk of pictures showing segregation in both the North and South. Students would then use a Venn diagram to analyze the differences and similarities in segregation the African Americans faced at that time.  They would then share their ideas with others.  Students would then choose one of the paintings from the gallery walk that they identify with the most or that depicts forms of racism they have either faced or witnessed. They could then share this vocally with the class or by written narrative.

In my curriculum students study the Civil Rights Movement and discussing Jim Crow laws is always of interest to students.  This would be a great opportunity to implement such a lesson.  The best part of my classes is that students get to share their own stories and making connections is a constant theme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

je.berg
Resources for Primary Sources

In addition to the library at the Phillips Collection and the resources in the Jacob Lawrence Teaching Kit, the Smithsonian recently launched a free online tool called Learning Lab. This tool allows users to build and save collections of resources located in Smithsonian databases.  For example, you could create a collection of resources related to segregation, add specific content and build-in activities for students access at school or on their computers at home.

Learn more at https://learninglab.si.edu

aprilhinnant1_1349
Migrations and Separation

In order to ensure my kindergarten students have a meaningful  connection with The Jacob Lawrence Migration Series,

I would us the following Prism.K12 strategies:  compare and empathize. 

 

I would use the strategy compare in order to ensure the lesson is meaningfult to my studnets by allowing my kids to use to compare and contrast

the difference and similarities of #19.  My students would have to use explicit vocabulary relating to line, shape color, etc.  This lesson would be integrated in one of my math lesson.  In addition to compare, I would use empathize.  We would use panel #49 to identify the characters in the paintings and there feelings.

 I would have the kids model what segregation felt like by conducting a mini lesson on segregation, then I would have students express how they felt and why they felt that way. 

je.berg
The Power of Empathize

The EMPATHIZE strategy is so powerful, especially when used with a work like the Migration Series. Your lesson would challenge Kindergarten students to step outside of themselves and try to understand and identify the emotions of someone else. I really like how you would take your lesson one step further and ask your students to explain why they were feeling the way they were.

 

The Feelings Book by Todd Parr is a picture book I often read aloud to my students (1st graders) at the beginning of each school year to help model the range of feelings humans can experience (it's limited, but developmentally appropriate). I love Todd Parr books and often use his texts as read alouds, priming students for future lessons.

Rhonda Ferguson (not verified)
Migration: Segregation and Discrimination

 

Looking at Panel #49 primarily and #19 to develop hands on connection. I would focus on two strategies: Empathize and Synthesize

My class is a Pre-Kindergarten 3 and year old mixed age group.

I would utilize developmentally appropriate practices, read the excerpt about the panel and have students focus on empathy.

Students would be encouraged to look at Panel #49 and discuss what the characters are feeling. Students will be encouraged to share their thinking and pushed through blooms higher order questioning process.

-What do you think the character is thinking?

Tell me what you are noticing in the picture to help you think this way.

-Tell me where in the picture you see this?

-Look at the hands, what do you see? How do you think he feels?

-Look at the rope, what does the rope represent?

-What has the rope created?

Students based on conversation and pre-planned guidance would then begin to explore the concept in a hands-on way.

Students would be divided randomly into two groups, a group with shoelaces, and a group with Velcro.

Students would then be given two different activities and bought back together to discuss how they felt.

-Did you want to join the other group?

-How did you feel about not being able to join the other group?

-How can we change this?

Students would then have the opportunity to work together and experience how together is better than separate.

-How did you feel when you could choose?

-Tell me how you worked together?

-What did you do with your friends?

Throughout the process I would also record the responses and have pictures of emotions to support the process and student responses.

There would also be the formation of a group conclusion that working together and being inclusive is better than working alone and isolating.

Even with differences, we can do the same things and work together.

 

A secondary hands on component would be to recreate with tangible materials Panel #19 and synthesize how we (the prek students and teachers) could change and make the scene new in a positive community building way.

Using sand, clay, play dough, real water (sand and water table), recreate the scene and solve the problem.

Students would be encouraged to find a solution.

Students would be provided with materials such as popsicle sticks, mini boats, figures, etc.

Students would have the opportunity to work together and create a way to bring the people together.

The goal would be a bridge built by students together.

 

kwegrzyn_1352
I love this!!!! Great idea

I love this!!!! Great idea with the hands-on component!

je.berg
Purposeful Groupings

Activities, like the one you've described above, create a shared experience that allows students to briefly feel the powerful emotions associated with having limited or different civil rights. I would recommend taking some time beforehand to create two purposeful groups, rather than random. For example, if you place close friends in different groups, they may be able to more clearly identify the feelings associated with being separated from people they care about. I've used the story of The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss as a primer for a similar activity as well, splitting the class into two groups with different activities or access to different classroom items.

Cheers, Jon

rhonda.ferguson_1351
Separation and Discrimination *Repost

Looking at Panel #49 primarily and #19 to develop hands on connection. I would focus on two strategies: Empathize and Synthesize

My class is a Pre-Kindergarten 3 and year old mixed age group. I would utilize developmentally appropriate practices, read the excerpt about the panel and have students focus on empathy.

Students would be encouraged to look at Panel #49 and discuss what the characters are feeling. Students will be encouraged to share their thinking and pushed through blooms higher order questioning process.

-What do you think the character is thinking?

Tell me what you are noticing in the picture to help you think this way.

-Tell me where in the picture you see this?

-Look at the hands, what do you see? How do you think he feels?

-Look at the rope, what does the rope represent?

-What has the rope created?

Students based on conversation and pre-planned guidance would then begin to explore the concept in a hands-on way.

Students would be divided randomly into two groups, a group with shoelaces, and a group with Velcro.

Students would then be given two different activities and bought back together to discuss how they felt.

-Did you want to join the other group?

-How did you feel about not being able to join the other group?

-How can we change this?

Students would then have the opportunity to work together and experience how together is better than separate.

-How did you feel when you could choose?

-Tell me how you worked together?

-What did you do with your friends?

Throughout the process I would also record the responses and have pictures of emotions to support the process and student responses.

There would also be the formation of a group conclusion that working together and being inclusive is better than working alone and isolating.

Even with differences, we can do the same things and work together.

 

A secondary hands on component would be to recreate with tangible materials Panel #19 and synthesize how we (the prek students and teachers) could change and make the scene new in a positive community building way.

Using sand, clay, play dough, real water (sand and water table), recreate the scene and solve the problem.

Students would be encouraged to find a solution.

Students would be provided with materials such as popsicle sticks, mini boats, figures, etc.

Students would have the opportunity to work together and create a way to bring the people together.

The goal would be a bridge built by students together.

kwegrzyn_1352
Segregation and Migration

Objective: Students will be able to compare and contrast segregation and discrimination in the North and South.

Prism K12 Strategies to be used throughout lesson: empathize, connect, and compare

I would also use panel #19 and #49.

I teach a fo

 

Students would first write down what they know about segregation and discriminiation.  Next, students would observe #19 and write down what they think is happening in the picture and any parts of the picture that jump out at them.  Students would then do the same for #49. 

Teacher will lead students in identifying the emotions of one of the people in the paintings and how the artist conveys that emotion. 

Students will then walk around the room as they look at copies of the two paintings on chart paper and write what they think each of the characters in the painting is feeling. 

Teacher will read aloud different Jim Crow laws in various states and ask students to identify where they think these laws are taking place.  

Teacher will explain that the laws were from the Southern states, but discrimination and segregation continued in the North.

Students will work in pairs to complete a venn diagram about the differences and similarities between Northern and Southern segregation and discrimination.

Teacher will then ask students to think about how segregation and discrimination might be similar or different today.  Teacher asks students to think of examples of when people now may feel like the people in the panels. 

Students will create their own panel illustrating the ways that segregation and discrimination are present today. 

 

 

 

 

je.berg
Post-its for Feelings or Dialogues

Providing students with post-its as they view prints of artworks can give them an opportunity to interact directly with the piece. In the past, I've challenged students to add dialogue to paintings (using post-it notes as dialogue bubbles). This activity can enrich the context of the painting and can also provide insight into the underlying emotions of the characters within the painting. I've found this works especially well with pieces that have multiple characters. Especially if each student in your class is adding dialogue to the same piece.

iteach2reachdc_1353
I reviewed the Jacob Lawrence

I reviewed the Jacob Lawrence life section, and I believe the current suggestions for lessons would work well in my classroom. The section suggested that students review the series and Jacob Lawrence's life. Then explain the different influences that the Harlem Renaissance  may have had on Jacob Lawrence’s work. Students could learn about the Harlem Renaissance creating a timeline of events and plotting his life on that timeline to see what other things may have influenced his work.

je.berg
I think using a timeline to

I think using a timeline to help students better understand what influenced Jacob Lawrence's work is a great idea. Timelines help provide a visual representation and a context for students and also helps them sequence historical events.

 

Cheers, Jon

sherry.lassiter_1355
Migration and Community

I chose the Migration and Community because it connects with a unit in our 2nd grade social studies curriculum. I think The Migration Series would tie in well with  this unit. I would use the Prism.K12 strategies of compare, empathize, and express to design a lesson around this content covered in this section. after in indepth exploration of The Migration Series and reading the book The Great Migration, we would use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast life for African Americans in the North and the South. Students would use the information for the Venn diagram to write a paragraph to express the differences and similarites of life for African Americans in the North and South. I also liked the litter writing activity on the Prism.K12 website under Life in the North. I could use this as an additional writing activity in class or a homework assignment. The letter writing activity would allow students to empathize with the experience of the migrants. 

cheard_1350
In my 4th grade classroom, I

In my 4th grade classroom, I could implement a lesson around Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000). Similar to the suggestion on the website, the overall idea would be for students to explore-- through artwork, photographs and other primary sources from the timeframe of his early years-- what life was like for Jacob Lawrence and how this impacted his creation of the Migration Series. Then students would research a historical figure of their choosing and create a piece of artwork inspired by that individual’s life and experiences.

 

 In this lesson, students will identify, connect and express.

 

Students will begin by identifying through primary sources and information shared from the teacher, what Jacob’s life was like. For instance, the teacher will share information including the fact that Jacob’s parents were separated and that he grew up in foster care for some time, or information on where he studied and where he was living while he created his Migration Series.  Students will see through photographs, what Jacob’s world, his environment, surroundings, neighborhood, city, etc looked like.

 

Then students make connections. Through examining and discussing with partners, students begin to identify what his childhood experience was: how he felt, what he may have experienced, etc.  Then as partners, students will think about How do the things you’ve identified about his Early Years connect to his series? How does how he grew up influence his art? Then discuss as a whole group.

 

On the website, the next step would be that students create their own piece of work inspired from their own lives (which I would definitely do as well, my lesson would be a step in between that, connected to their Social Studies curriculum). Students pick an important or meaningful historical figure to them and research that individual’s Early Years. Filling out a graphic organizer to complement their research, students find out information about where the person grew up, how she grew up, what her world was like at the time (personally, at home, in her community, in her country, world, etc), the people and things most influential to her, etc. Once the information is researched and recorded, students then create a collage of ideas with words, pictures and important ideas about their selected person’s life.  Next students are asked to take the perspective of the person they have researched and create an original piece of artwork inspired by the life of that person. Thinking about the events they experienced in their life, what type of art would this person create? What might it look like?

 

 

After the artwork is created, students will write a paragraph to reflect on how the stories of the person they researched influenced the art they created and reflect on their experiences taking on the perspective of that person. 

Virginia.ButeRi...
Lawrence's Artistic Process & ID + Compare + Express strategies

The National Visual Arts Standards for 2nd grade has a performance standard that says students should be able to create works of art about events in home, school, or community life.  In my art room we would examine a section of the Migration Series, possibly panels 32-35.  Using the Artful Thinking strategy see/think/wonder students could examine the details and identify the story Lawrence is telling.  We would compare and contrast the way Lawrence tells a story to the way a comic book artist tells a story.  Students would decide on a story to tell about their family, school, or community and use a series of panels create detailed drawings to express the beginning, middle, and end of their story.  To connect with Lawrence’s process of conducting research students might bring in an old family photograph from home.  They could interview a family member to get more information about what is going on in the photograph before working on their drawings.  Students would be challenged to express their ideas in images rather than relying on adding speech bubbles to their work.  They would be encouraged to add captions to their panels, as Lawrence did.  As another option for the project, students could work together to tell a story about their school day with each student in the group illustrating one of the panels.

 
Trinity (not verified)
Jacob Lawrence in the Classroom

Each year we celebrate Black History Month during the month of February and feature different notable African-Americans, Afro-Latinos, or Africans. I thought it would be a fun activity to have an activity to learn about the man, Jacob Lawrence, with either our Computer Literacy or GED English classes.

IDENTIFY and EXPRESS would probably fit this activity most.

1. Teacher/myself would talk about key facts: Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration of African-Americans, and then the man, Jacob Lawrence.

2. Either class would use computer lab time to do more research on Jacob Lawrence. Class can be split up into 4-5 groups or pairs depending on class size, each group would have a certain aspect they must research. 

3. Each group/pair would create 1-2 slides about their particular topic.

4. Questions that students could answer and not limited to: 1) Timeline of his life, 2) What would $1,400 mean today?, 3) How did JL help the African-American community?, 4) Who from your country is similar to JL?, 5) What could YOU do to make people culturally aware of current immigration?

 

The lesson could go many ways.

Ultimately, a slide-show would be compiled and this presentation would be shown at the cultural events and/or throughout the campus on the IP-TVs.

The classroom could end the month by visiting the Phillips Collection to see the Migration Series in person.

 

 

Janee.Jackson_1360
Segregation and Discrimination Lesson

As I take a deeper dive into "Discrimination in the North", I think about how the migration series portrayed the idea that once in the North things would be better. But as we take a closer look, especially in the wake of last week's events, we (as. Turner Elementary School) can still see the presence of discrimination currently. 

The lesson that I plan to roll out with my 2nd graders  will incorporate a few PrismK12 strategies:

1. Introduce the Parker Cloud graffiti art. 

2. Model the process of #EXPRESSing yourselves through various works of art

3. #COMPARing and #EMPATHIZing with other classmates and their stories

4. Then, as class #COLLABORATE and #CREATE a series "Turner Elementary: Ward 8 Series" that will share our stories with the school community and others. 

NyaRooks (not verified)
The Migration Series Panel No. 19

Many of the students in my class relate better to a new piece of information when that information is relative to them. To teach a lesson using the Jacob Lawrence Migration Series Panel No. 19, I would implement the PrismK12 strategy of EMPATHY. Below you will find an outline on how that lesson could look:

Steps:

1. Prepare in small clear containers samples of clean and dirty water. Place those containers in a colored container.

2. Have the containers in a box of opposite colors

3. Hand out (at random) pieces of construction paper matching rhe colors on the box

4. Allow students to draw conatainers. The class should open them together.

5. Begin lesson by having students discuss how they would feel if they had to drink the conceled water. From there open discussion on feelings and how we can relate to others although we really do not know how or what they are actually feeling.

 

This lesson would best be taught using the socartic method. I personally enjoy utilizing this method when abstract thinking is required. It allows the children to hear what the other has to say and they can build upon each other, yielding in them owning their learning.

 

 

anjermann_1586
which of the six Prism.K12 strategies...

Reflecting on the narr  of the series and how I can integrate that into my World History course.  I am thinking of using the strategy of Compare to specifically compare it to some of the narratives/stories of people trying to leave areas of war and gennocide and how they were prevented and segragated.   One of the issues my students have struggled with understanding and making sense of is the idea that during the holocause (and other genocides in history) that the people were prevented from leaving.  I found several of the Panels showed this powerfully.  I pland to find historial examples (stories, photo's and other forms of art) that the students can compare to panels 22, 41, 42,).   The students then can compare them and look for common themes, the "language" of the immage and what that can tell us of peoples experiences.

campbell_an_1587
Strategy for lesson_Empathize. panel 21

Of the six Prism.k12 strategies, I will use “Empathize” in my lesson with Panel 21 of the Migration series.  Panel 21 depicts a few people waiting with their luggage. In the distance though it appears huge numbers of people are lined up or waiting. Possibly many of them will miss the train and will not be Northbound until another time.
My class of first and second graders is working through an “All About Family Unit”. Additionally, we have had whole class discussions about moving and who has moved – most of them have moved either short or long distances, across town, state to state, of from other countries. This focus provides students a chance to empathize better by connecting their own stories, in many cases.
I like the idea of students physically modeling the family looking into the distance. They can take turns doing this – being the ones looking out and wondering about their future in the North. Groups of 4 or 5 can have dialogue about how it would feel to leave home… what might you need/want with you? Might there be mixed emotions? Why and what would they be?
As a follow up lesson, I like the idea of writing letters to loved ones either from the North (describing what it feels like to far away from what they’ve always know, friends, etc) or the South (send letters North describing fears and also hopes for the future).

jltrout_1577
Jacob Lawrence's Artistic Process

Jacob Lawrence Artistic Process
Grades 1-2
Shape scavenger hunt sheets (Lesson 1- basic shapes, Lesson 2 -organic/geometric  categories shapes)
Vocabulary:
Organic: shapes that have curved edges, rounded, and flowing can be found in nature.
Geometric: Uniform in measurement with shapes edges such as triangles, squares, rectangles.
Composition- placement of arrangement of elements, or ingredients, in a work of art.
Sketching materials, Tempera cakes, construction paper
Main Strategies used: Identify, Compare, Synthesize
Time allotted (4) 30 minute session
Background/previous lessons- students would have had previous background of the Great Migration series through read aloud using the resources The Great Migration  An American Story and Jake Makes a World: Jacob Lawrence, A Young Artist in Harlem  and lessons around basic shapes
Lesson 1- Identify- panels 3,6,7, 9
Using a variety of examples from The Great Migration series- students will work collaboratively in table groups. They will have a shape scavenger hunt sheet and drawing paper to record the different shapes they discover.  After 5-10 minutes we will gather as a group to study panel 45 to analyze and discuss his work using the inquiry method of see, think, and wonder.  If time allows students will practice sketching the artwork they analyzed
Lesson 2- Compare- panels- (7,13), (18,19) (22, 58) (10,45)
Using the same technique of inquiry above, students in table groups will have 2 examples from the series. This time they will be comparing the use of organic vs. geometric shapes. After the organic vs. geometric scavenger hunt- whole group discussion will be about the use of these shapes and the “mood” or feel Jacob Lawrence might have wanted to capture.
Lesson 3- Synthesize-panel 45
Students will be creating artwork inspired by the work of Jacob Lawrence to create a piece that represents a time of migration incorporating food/items that would reflect our own families cultural identity using the composition of panel 45 with the picnic basket as a the starting point. Students will have access to “shopping” for objects that might be found in the picnic baskets. In table groups, students set up a still life in the center of the table. Turn and talk about the basic shapes they observe using the terms of organic/geometric. Students will begin sketching the still life using only basic shapes with minimal details (blocking/composing).
Students will take their basic layouts and begin color blocking with an intro on Jacob Lawrence’s color basic color palette and why he made these artist choices.  Final work will be displayed with a title and artist statement.

sistateacher_1581
Migration & Community: Synthesis in the LA /Humanities classroom

I chose to examine Migration and Community. What really jazzed me was looking under "Discrimination in the North" and finding the In the Classroom: Langston Hughes Poetry Activity. (First students are asked to identify situations in the series where Jacob Lawrence depicts discrimination. Then they are asked to  select and research a group that faces or has faced discrimination to determine that group's experience and reaction to discrimination. Then the students are to synthesize their research by creating a work of art or poem that explores the past and present situation for that group of people.)

I would play around with this a bit.                                                                                                                                                                                                       It is the synthesizing that interests me. Introducing the students to Langston Hughes' poetry concerning migration would be the first step before doing the research mentioned above. Have students find photographs or other art that represent those experiences. Then, instead of captions, what if we commissioned students to write dialogue poems concerning the past and present in response to the panels depicting discrimination in the North  as well as using the research that they have done, respond in a dialogue poem from the persona(e) of that group's experience. The student's own experience could also be added. 

I would use this approach because  being able enter into dialogue with all sorts of people is a necessary skill, especially today. For students to be able to use and sense of their research over time and space through this time of poetry would be really powerful. On Martin Luther King, Jr Day at the rally at Seattle's federal building, a group of four high school girls performed a dialogue poem concerning migration, immigration, discrimination, education and their rights. The students were Latina (Mexican - heritage), African/African American, Pacific Islander/Hawaii'an /indigenous, and Asian American American. They drew upon their own lived experiences along with the inclusion of African and indigenous experiences. It was dope!

Later I noticed "Migration Series Poetry Suite" under other resources, where ten contemporary poets were commissioned to write new poems in response to the Migration Series! I would want to find a way to incorporate these works into the lesson.

savyjam_1579
Compare and empathy

Empathy and compare
Given the current anti-immigration climate, I would want my high school students to compare the motivations and experiences of African Americans who left the south during the Great Migration to those of contemporary immigrants who leave their countries under duress and want to gain entrance into the United States.
I would select panels that would illustrate the story that the migration of African Americans from the south was a form of resistance to economic, social and political oppression. Possible panels would include:  1,7,8,9,11,14,15,17,19,22,24,30,33,36,37,38,42,49,58.
Students would be required to choose one group to research the immigration experiences of people from Latin America, the Middle East, or Eastern Europe.  They would compare and contrast those experiences to those of the African Americans during the Great Migration.
Students would then be asked to create 7 to 12 captions for artistic panels that would tell the story of the group they researched. The could then write a reflection that points out the similarities and differences between the past and present experiences of people resiting oppression by leaving their ho,mes.

csdijulio_1588
Identify Compare Express 49

Jacob Lawrence
The Migration Series, Panel No. 49
They also found discrimination in the North. It was a different kind.

Segregation and Discrimination (Life in the North)
Identify, Compare, Express

Grade: 2
Time: 45+ mins
Vocabulary: Discrimination, Segregation, Migrants, Racism, Injustice
Materials: Panel No. 49, color pencils, crayons, paper

Our class is finishing up with our Civil Rights social studies unit. We will connect this knowledge with the learning that people move North, because of discrimination in the South, in search of a better life. Unfortunately they still found discrimination. It looked a bit different.

WHOLE GROUP/PARTNER DISCUSSION
We will review/teach vocabulary connecting to what they already know from our recent studies.

Discrimination: Judging, treating others unfairly based on certain categories (not judging by character).
Segregation: Separation, separating people based on how they look.
Migrants: Someone who moves for work.
Racism: the belief that one race is better than others so they are treated differently.
Injustice: Unfair treatment

We will review a map of the US to understand where people in the South were moving from and where in the North people were moving to.
Explain/Read the following:

African Americans lived with legalized discrimination in the South that impacted and threatened their daily lives. These conditions motivated the Great Migration for those seeking a better life in the North. When the migrants arrived in northern cities, they faced a new form of discrimination.
This section explores and compares the different forms of racism that African Americans encountered throughout the country. Examine how different artists responded to and portrayed systematic racism and then identify contemporary examples of social injustice.

(Identify)How did this artist show discrimination and segregation in this picture?
(Compare) How is it different than pictures we have seen showing discrimination and segregation?
How is it similar?
(Identify) What ways do we still see discrimination and segregation?
(Express) How might artists represent discrimination and segregation that is happening today?

After discussing and charting responses. Students will have time to draw their picture to represent how discrimination and/segregation is still present. I will challenge them to come up with a caption as well.

jltrout_1577
Strategy: comparing visual representations using panel 58

Jacob Lawrence – The Great Migration
Artistic Process
Grades 2
Main Strategies: Compare with the visuals and shapes integrated with the social studies unit of Safari to Kenya with an emphasis on the Masai people
Panel 58 with a visual representation of a Masai family of three
Vocabulary:
Shades/Values/skin tones
Patterns
Warm colors
Pre-lesson- project with an emphasis on using basic shapes and repetition to create individual versions of panel 58
Background: history time period/conditions that led up to the Great Migration
Introduction:
View the representation of a Masai family using the questioning technique of :
What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder?
Show panel 58 with the visual of the Masai family 
Building upon what they have learned as part of the social studies intensive study of comparing why people migrate use a t- chart  with the guiding questions of :
They both have:
(responses) shape, patterns, repetition, brown skin, action positions, geometric shapes, triangles
Artistic process:
Students create a visual sketch using the same processes of drawing the basic shapes as they did with panel 58.
Students transfer sketch to etching/scratch art paper. Shapes are etched out incorporating patterns, repetition, and color blocking.
Artwork is displayed with the representation of panel 58 with the responses form both the classroom investigation of migration and the artistic process.

sistateacher_1581
Follow up "And the migrants kept coming": Interior Monologues

8th grade and above

Language Arts

Prism K-12 Strategies: Identify, Connect,  Compare, Express, Empathize, Synthesize...Panels # 4, 29, 48, 50, 52, 53, 60 are useful for this project.

My principal encouraged me to do a unit on Asian immigrant fiction, focusing on Asian immigration to the United States using the book club format. Each book club reads a book. This provides an interesting twist and continuation on the Migration Series:  here in Seattle, as in many other cities in the West Coast, migrants from the South lived in the same neighborhoods with various Asian immigrant groups. In what ways were the the experiences of Asian immigrants similar to African American migrants? How were the experiences of Asian immigrants different from African American migrants? In what ways are the migrants and immigrants changed by their journeys and their new environments?

 

Students will be able to see how fiction expresses these experiences.

The culminating project will be an *interior monologue*: Students will connect, express, empathize with and synthesize the migrant and immigrant experience by using interior monologues to tap into a fictional character's pain, hopes, dreams, and aspirations for the present and the future.

* After finishing their books, students are to think about key moments in the book, turning points, tensions and struggles concerning systemic racism, discrimination along with segregation. How else could that character have reacted to that situation if given another opportunity? If we understand our characters and their context, we have insight as to how our characters started out thinking and acting--and how and why they begin to change.

The interior monologue can be written as a poem (seven stanzas with five lines per stanza) or as a speech (1 & 1/2 - 2 pages). This can also be done as a choreopoem /group poem where each person in a group of 2 - 3 still writes seven stanzas with five lines per stanza, but are able to combine them for the purpose of performing it (Our students were taught this technique by Imani Sims, our teaching artist).

It would be extremely cool if in a group poem, one student took the perspective of one of the African American characters and the other took the perspective of  one of the Asian/Asian American characters.

 

 

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